When did time become global?

On Monday, 16 November the Institute for Transnational & Spatial History will be hosting Professor Sebastian Conrad from the Free University of Berlin. As part of our Modern History Seminar Series, Professor Conrad will be speaking on “The Revolution of Time in the Nineteenth Century: Global Perspectives

Sebastian Conrad

Sebastian Conrad

Time & Venue: 5.15pm, New Seminar Room, St John’s House, South Street. The talk is open to the public.

At 2pm there will be an informal seminar with Professor Conrad with postgraduate students (at invitation only).

Sebastian Conrad is professor in Global History at the Free University of Berlin since 2010, following a stint at the European University Institute in Florence. Originally his background is in Japanese and Western European history, which is reflected in his first monograph “In Quest for the Lost Nation” (2010), a comparison of German and Japanese historiographical traditions on the period of the

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

World Wars, the Third Reich and the Japanese Empire respectively.

His “Globalisation and the Nation” (2014) analyses the many and complex cross-border factors and actors, including Chinese or Polish migrations, that have shaped discourses of the nation and the concept of German labour in the Wilhelmine Empire.

Furthermore, he has published widely on colonialism and global history, including his “German Colonialism. A Short History” (2012). An introduction to global history is in preparation and will be out in early 2016.

 

Chasing statistical nodes – Welcome Adam Dunn

We would like to warmly welcome Adam Dunn as a new (and partly old) PhD student at the ITSH. Adam took his undergraduate degree at the University of York in History, graduating in 2011 before he started his masters in early modern history at the University of St Andrews. After finishing his MLitt at St Andrews he took two gap years where he worked in various places including a law firm and the IT department of a paper mill.

In September 2015, Adam returned to St Andrews starting a research project under the working title “From words to numbers and maps. Transfers, networks and the transformations of statistical thinking in Britain, France and the German lands, c. 1780s-1840s”.

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Here is Adam: “I returned to St Andrews to peruse my PhD with Dr. Bernhard Struck at the ITSH. I returned for a number of reasons, not least the fantastic academic atmosphere in St Andrews, but also because of the burgeoning new Institute for Transnational & Spatial History. I am currently half way through my first term as a PhD and am auditing an MLitt module on core skills for transnational history, including historical mapping and database creation.” – A steep and hopefully fruitful learning curve.

Statistics are a fascinating topic, primarily studied and researched within the units that gave birth to modern statistics: the (nation) state. The project seeks to trace actors and networks spun by amateur statisticians – via travel, correspondence, journals – during the decades around 1800.  There is more on the project under PhDs.

Welcome Adam – enjoy reading your statistics!