The Female Travel Connection – Welcome Sophie Drescher

This term Sophie Drescher is joining us at the ITSH. Sophie is a graduate from Tübingen University where she worked on female travellers and modes of travel writing as part of her final year’s master thesis. Intrigued by the ITHS agenda of bringing transnational history in discussion with spatial history, Sophie decided to join the team. A warm welcome to you, Sophie!

The project in a nutshell:

What do we really know about travelling women, their roles, and the social spaces they occupied around 1800? This study traces European women travellers’ social networks on their journeys through Europe and beyond during the decades around 1800.

Women authors 18th century

Women authors 18th century

The project will examine how women’s travel was planned and how itineraries developed along social and geographical lines, thereby creating transnational European networks. The project, however, is not designed exclusively as a gender-studies project that focuses on solely female authors. It aims to highlight connectivity of women travellers in relation to their male counterparts, as well as in connection to other female travellers and their networks.

This study is underpinned by the hypothesis that political and cultural developments in Europe around 1800 altered established travel routes and opened up new spaces across Europe, especially to the north and east, for travellers to explore. It is key to link the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries as this time frame, with its political upheavals and cultural turmoil, meant travellers were caught in a rapidly changing social world. Research has neglected the impact of this crucial time period on travellers’ experiences of social and geographical space, especially with reference to women’s negotiations of ‘space’ and ‘sphere’ in changing European societies.

Traveling during the 18th century

Traveling during the 18th century

The project will provide an enhanced understanding of how women travelled, how travelling changed between the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It will lead to a more nuanced understanding of planning processes, the use of letters of recommendation, the significance of family members and acquaintances, and the influence of the individual’s social network on the individual’s itinerary. By including travel narratives from more than one European region and covering more than one travel destination the study’s findings will offer a broad panorama of European women’s travel activities and be of interest to a broader, European, audience beyond strictly national historiography.

Read more on Sophie’s project.

Peripherien – New book series on “European History”

The first volume of the new book series Peripherien. Beiträge zur Europäischen Geschichte (eds. Christof Dejung, Johannes Feichtinger, Martin Lengwiler, Ulrike Lindner, Bernhard Struck, Jakob Vogel) has just come out. It is entitled: Ränder der Moderne. Neue Ansätze zur europäischen Geschichte (1860-1930), eds. Martin Lengwiler & Christof Dejung (Cologne Weimar Vienna: Böhlau, 2015).

Ränder der Moderne (Böhlau)

Ränder der Moderne (Böhlau)

The book series has grown out of our GRAINES network and the shared interest in European history in transnational perspective. European history, as we see it, needs to respond to and reflect on the recent trends in Global History. What we aim at is a series that combines monographs and edited volumes that highlight the polycentric and provicialised nature of Europe.

The first volume combines chapters that refer to transnational, postcolonial, and global history approaches, in oder to develop new perspective on European history. At the same time, the volume follows the idea to approach Europe from the margins, with an aim to flesh out similarities within Europe as well as conflicts beyond Europe.

Let’s talk about Transnational History – Research in Dialogue

PhD researchers from the European University Institute, Florence have taken the initiative – they kicked of a series of interviews with historians from different national and institutional backgrounds on European history with a comparative and transnational focus. The series “Research in Dialogue – Dialogue in Research” is published by geschichte.transnational and HSozKult.

The series includes interviews with Lucy Riall, currently professor in Comparative History of Europe at the EUI, and Stéphane van Damme, professor in the History of Science at the EUI.

The latest interview has been published with Bernhard Struck, bernhard-struckformer director of our ITSH. The conversation addresses questions of direction of the field, the relevance of scales between micro and macro history, the neglected spatial element of transnational history, as well as potential tensions between national funding and an increasingly transnationally-driven research environment – and the world more broadly. Read the full interview here.

For more interviews with our colleagues from the EUI enjoy reading the interviews with Luca Molà, Ann Thomson or Alexander Etkind.

The ITSH and the EUI cooperate at the level of PhD exchanges via an Erasmus exchange link. If you are interested in coming to St Andrews or going to Florence, get in touch.

When did time become global?

On Monday, 16 November the Institute for Transnational & Spatial History will be hosting Professor Sebastian Conrad from the Free University of Berlin. As part of our Modern History Seminar Series, Professor Conrad will be speaking on “The Revolution of Time in the Nineteenth Century: Global Perspectives

Sebastian Conrad

Sebastian Conrad

Time & Venue: 5.15pm, New Seminar Room, St John’s House, South Street. The talk is open to the public.

At 2pm there will be an informal seminar with Professor Conrad with postgraduate students (at invitation only).

Sebastian Conrad is professor in Global History at the Free University of Berlin since 2010, following a stint at the European University Institute in Florence. Originally his background is in Japanese and Western European history, which is reflected in his first monograph “In Quest for the Lost Nation” (2010), a comparison of German and Japanese historiographical traditions on the period of the

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

World Wars, the Third Reich and the Japanese Empire respectively.

His “Globalisation and the Nation” (2014) analyses the many and complex cross-border factors and actors, including Chinese or Polish migrations, that have shaped discourses of the nation and the concept of German labour in the Wilhelmine Empire.

Furthermore, he has published widely on colonialism and global history, including his “German Colonialism. A Short History” (2012). An introduction to global history is in preparation and will be out in early 2016.

 

Chasing statistical nodes – Welcome Adam Dunn

We would like to warmly welcome Adam Dunn as a new (and partly old) PhD student at the ITSH. Adam took his undergraduate degree at the University of York in History, graduating in 2011 before he started his masters in early modern history at the University of St Andrews. After finishing his MLitt at St Andrews he took two gap years where he worked in various places including a law firm and the IT department of a paper mill.

In September 2015, Adam returned to St Andrews starting a research project under the working title “From words to numbers and maps. Transfers, networks and the transformations of statistical thinking in Britain, France and the German lands, c. 1780s-1840s”.

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Here is Adam: “I returned to St Andrews to peruse my PhD with Dr. Bernhard Struck at the ITSH. I returned for a number of reasons, not least the fantastic academic atmosphere in St Andrews, but also because of the burgeoning new Institute for Transnational & Spatial History. I am currently half way through my first term as a PhD and am auditing an MLitt module on core skills for transnational history, including historical mapping and database creation.” – A steep and hopefully fruitful learning curve.

Statistics are a fascinating topic, primarily studied and researched within the units that gave birth to modern statistics: the (nation) state. The project seeks to trace actors and networks spun by amateur statisticians – via travel, correspondence, journals – during the decades around 1800.  There is more on the project under PhDs.

Welcome Adam – enjoy reading your statistics!

Dividing the World? – 4th GRAINES Summer School

The winter ahead – the next summer (school) in mind. We are pleased to announce the theme of our 4th GRAINES summer school: Dividing the World? Imperial Formations in Continental and Maritime Empires from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century. 

Following our summer schools in Menton (France), Vienna, St Andrews, GRAINES2016 will be hosted by our colleagues Ulrike Lindner and Dörte Lerp from the University of Cologne.

Information will be announced under grainesnetwork.com. You can follow us under the twitter hashtag #Graines2016. More to come soon.

 

Global History Lecture – Welcome Emma Hunter

Dr Emma Hunter (Edinburgh) will be giving a research seminar paper on “Concepts of Democracy in Mid-Twentieth-Century Africa: Re-Imagining Political Accountability from the Bottom Up”. Emma Hunter

Emma Hunter is a lecturer in Global History at Edinburgh University. Her research focus is on African history in relation to political, intellectual and cultural history as well as the history of African print cultures. Her monograph “Political Thought and the Public Sphere in Tanzania: Freedom, Democracy and Citizenship in the Era of Decolonisation” was published with CUP in 2015. Congratulations, Emma!

Time & Venue: Monday 19 October 2015, New Seminar Room, School of History, University of St Andrews, 5.15pm.

More on the Modern History Research Seminar series – please see under Modern History Seminar .

Key Note Lecture “The Global 1989 – networks of neoliberalism”

As part of the 3rd Graines Summer School under the title INTERCONNECTED Professor Philipp Ther will be giving a key note lecture on “The global 1989 – networks of neoliberalism”.

Time & Venue: Monday, 8 June 2015, 5.30pm – University St Andrews, School 2, St Salvator’s Quad.

Philipp Ther is professor in Eastern and East Central European history at the University of Vienna. His main research focuses on the history of Poland, the Czech lands, and Ukraine.

Professor Philipp Ther, University of Vienna

Professor Philipp Ther, University of Vienna

He has a particular interest in comparative and transnational history of the region, mainly on the 19th and 20th century. Professor Ther has published widely on the region on border lands, ethnic cleansing or the role of the opera in central Europe.

His key note, based on his recent “Die neue Ordnung auf dem alten Kontinent” (Suhrkamp Verlag) revolves around the transformation of East Central and Central Europe from the images1980s into the present days. It draws a number of connections and comparisons between Poland, former Czechoslovakia, GDR, Hungary and beyond – for instance on the “co-transformation” of unified Germany, or the lack of similar processes in southern Europe – and the transfers of neoliberal thought from the “West” to central Europe before, during and after the crucial years around 1989.

Welcome Professor Fabricio Prado

The School of History and the Institute for Transnational & Spatial History welcome Professor Fabricio Prado from the College of William & Mary, Virginia. As part of our joint international Masters Programme between St Andrews and William & Mary members of staff cross the Atlantic on a regular bases to foster research and teaching links.

Professor Fabricio Prado, College of William & Mary

Professor Fabricio Prado, College of William & Mary

Professor Prado will be spending some time at St Andrews in early May 2015. He specialises in the the history of trade networks, global cities and borderlands, mainly in the Southern Atlantic as a connecting zone between the Spanish, Portuguese and British Empires in the eighteenth century.

Due to a number of links and shared interests around trade, cities, networks, global & transnational history, Fabricio will be a more regular guest in  the coming months. Fabricio will be back as part of our GRAINES summer school Interconnected in early June 2015. He will also be collaborating with Dr Emma Hart on the AHRC-funded network on Global Cities.

On 6 May 2015 Fabricio will give a paper entitled ‘Entangled Empires: Spanish and Portuguese Networks in the South Atlantic (1777-1805)’. Venue: School of History, St John’s House, St Andrews, New Seminar Room. Time: 4.30pm.

Leverhulme Visiting Professor Elena Marushiakova-Popova

We would like welcome our Leverhulme Visiting Professor Elena Marushiakova-Popova, who will be hosted by the School of History and the Institute for Transnational & Spatial History in 2014-15.

This is how Professor Marushiakova-Popova describes her research interests:

Professor Elena Marushiakova

Professor Elena Marushiakova

“I research a wide variety of topics from the history, ethnography, traditional and modern ethnic culture of the Roma (formerly known as ‘Gypsies’) in Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe, and post-Soviet Central Asia and South Caucasus. On the other hand, I also probe into contemporary ethno-cultural and socio-political processes unfolding in Roma communities in the aforementioned areas, including their migrations to Western Europe. Such case studies feed into my broader work on ethnic processes, identity formation, the dynamics of national identity and transnational identities.

I have worked in the field of Romani Studies for more than three decades. Now I am President of the Gypsy Lore Society. This most important and oldest international scholarly organization devoted to Romani Studies. I am also founding and Scientific Committee member of the European Academic Network on Romani Studies, established by European Commission and Council of Europe. I am a member of the editorial boards of the international peer reviewed journals Romani Studies and Studia Romologica (Poland), and of the book series Grazer Romani Studien (University of Graz)and Nationalisms Across the Globe (Peter Lang).

During my Leverhulme Professorship I will strive to integrate the Roma history into the mainstream of European and global history, of which Roma have been an inalienable part since the Middle Ages. Simultaneously, I will work on my new research project ‘In Search of Utopia: Roma Visionaries (1865-1971).’ The project gathers and analyzes the written source-based history of Roma political visions of the future, as placed in broader intellectual framework of those times. With this research I will help including the history of Roma political ideas into the mainstream of the history of European thought.”

Throughout the academic year, Professor Marushiakova-Popova, will contribute to a number of research seminars and postgraduate teaching and supervision. Welcome, Elena.