CFP “The Global City, Past and Present” (Workshop 1: “Space”, St Andrews, 14-15 May 2015)

EmmaHartWe are delighted to announce that Dr Emma Hart has been awarded an AHRC International Research Network Grant for her project on Global Cities. You can read more about Dr Hart’s successful application on the School of History’s blog.

Applications are now open for the project’s first workshop in May 2015. You can access the full Call for Papers by clicking on this link. Proposals and a CV should be sent to Emma Hart (efh2 [a] st-andrews.ac.uk) by 30th September 2014.

Mapping and Visualising Transnational (Hi)Stories

Where is transnational history? What spaces are produced by transnational flows and cross-border connections? Can computer tools and Digital Humanities help us to achieve an Atlas of Transnational History? How to we implement digital tools into our curriculum as well as doing and practicing transnational history?

Tobias Englmeier introducing Three.js Layer

Tobias Englmeier introducing Three.js Layer

These were some of the questions discussed during our Mapping and Visualising Transnational (Hi)Stories workshop, held at St Andrews 8-10 June 2014 in collaboration with the GRAINES network. The material, further questions, maps, tools and key readings can be accessed through transnationalhistory.net/mvth and on twitter via #mvth.

Trying not to fall behind the tech elements

Trying not to fall behind the tech elements

At the Centre for Transnational History we will keep discussing the topic over the coming months. Jordan Girardin will be hosting a workshop on Mapping Flows and Visualising Data, 28 August 2014 and with a panel at the ENIUGH 2014 conference in Paris.

Uta Hinrichs on the Trading Consequences project

Uta Hinrichs on the Trading Consequences project

Spatial history along with technologies and tools to map and visualise will also be a central part of our new MLitt programme on Transnational, Global and Spatial History that we will start teaching in 2015-16. Further information on the programme will be published shortly.

 

New Strand on Transnational and Global History

This year’s annual conference of the Social History Society, held at Newcastle University 8-10 April 2014, opened with a number of new strands, one of which in Transnational and Global History. The new strand was launched with a panel on “Perceiving and Conceptualising Space“. The panel included three of our current PhD students Dawn Jackson Williams, Jordan Girardin and Jason Varner.

The connecting theme and analytical perspective through the three papers on early European encounters with the new world (Jason Varner), the perception of landscape and mountains in the early modern period (Dawn Jackson Williams) and the making of the Alps as a transnational space (Jordan Girardin) was taken from Henri Lefebvre’s The Production of Space.

In particular Lefebvre’s conceptions of space and spatial practices including espace vécu (lived space) as well as representations of space have and will continue to be a theme around various activities at the Centre including reading groups and workshops on mapping and visualisation of transnational spaces.

 

Call for Papers: GRAINES Summer School 2014, Vienna

As part of the GRAINES Network, members of the Centre for Transnational History will be actively involved in its second summer school. After last year in Menton on “From the Margins”, this year’s summer school will take place in Vienna from 10th to 14th June 2014. The theme will be “The European City in Transformation: from the Early Modern Period to the Present”.

Applications are open until 15 March 2014.

More information and download Call for Papers

For 2015, we are looking towards hosting a joint GRAINES and FUTH (Flying University of Transnational Humanities) at St Andrews. For the 2014 Call for Papers for the FUTH on “Globalization East”, please see below.

Mapping Transnational (Hi)Stories

Mapping and Visualising Transnational Flows and Connections

A number of our individual research projects share an interest in space and spatial history. Defining transnational history as a way of seeing and a perspective that is interested in people, in nodes and honeycombs (P. Clavin) as well as the flows and connections across borders, raises pressing questions: Where is transnational history? Does transnational history need to rethink spatial issues? What kind of maps and visualisation could be integrated in transnational history – both as a way of analysis as well as narrative and story telling?

It is interesting to see that, over the past ten to fifteen years, an interest in spatial history (spatial turn) as well as in transnational (and global) history has developed almost simultaneously. If we accept that space (Raum / espace) is not simply absolute, a fact or a reality, but a product of social interaction and thus made, this would feed back into the questions raised above.

At the same time, new and previously unprecedented technologies of communication and mapping have become available. By asking: Where is transnational history? How to bring space back in? we seek to address these questions in a loose series of reading group sessions (held at the Centre for Transnational History), small-scale workshops (at St Andrews, in collaboration with GRAINES and beyond) and presentations/panels at a number of conferences.

What we seek to explore across projects ranging from travel activities to the Habsburg Empire (Martin Schaller), global cities (Emma Hart), alpine regions (Dawn Hollis, Jordan Girardin), scientific networks around 1800 (Sarah Easterby-Smith), spatial issues related to national socialism (Riccardo Bavaj) or transnational biographies (Bernhard Struck) are ways to tell these stories through technologies of mapping and visualisation.

Further information will be made available shortly via: Mapping Transnational (Hi)Stories 

The first meeting for the workshop / reading group on space will meet Wednesday 16 October 2013, 5.30pm. The venue is room 0.02, School of History, St Katharine’s Lodge, The Scores, St Andrews.

 

 

Bringing Space into Transnational History

Reading Group

Over the coming academic year (2013-14) a number of members of staff and PhD researcher will be meeting for a series of reading group sessions on the theme of space in transnational history. Transnational history has been broadly defined as being interested in connections across borders as well as in flows of goods, people, ideas across, through and above nations. As a perspective or way of seeing transnational history has been characterised as being primarily concerned with people as actors that create webs of connections as well as circulations, honeycombs and nodes of interaction across borders.

Such a definition raises questions of space and scale that we seek to discuss in a series of reading sessions and ultimately in a form of a workshop. What a number of colleagues are interested in is the question of how to spatialise and, consequently, how to map and visualise transnational histories and the flows and connections it is interested in. With these challenges and problems on space and scale in mind, what we seek to discuss in the coming year(s) is the combination and interrelation of transnational and global history on the one hand with the simultaneous (re)emergence of space and spatial issues since the early 1990s on the other.

While individual members of the reading groups work on rather diverse topics (travel, science, cities), we seek to explore ways of visualising and mapping flows and connections by collaborating with disciplines including geography and computer science.

Dates for meetings and readings will be posted shortly under Readings. For further questions or signalling interest in participating in any of the meetings, please feel free to contact Bernhard Struck (bs50@st-andrews.ac.uk).