Workshop: Spatial History and Its Sources

On 2 September, the Institute for Transnational and Spatial History will hold a workshop on “Spatial History and Its Sources.” You can find out more about the workshop and its schedule here.

The workshop will bring together historians with a selection of sources that can help us explore the new field of Spatial History. Spatial History can be understood in multiple ways: First, there is the historical exploration of physical-geographical realities, including cities, mountains, rivers, and oceans. Second, there is the historical exploration of spaces that are constituted by social relations and human interaction, including traveling, letter writing and any other form of social communication (acts of violence included). Third, there is the historical exploration of spaces that are imagined and discursively constructed, including mental maps and infrastructure plans. Needless to say, of course, that these three modes of historical exploration may all be employed in regard to a given subject: A mountain range, a landscape, or architectural site are as much a physical reality as they are an imagined space. The Alps are a physical reality – one that can be measured and gauged; as a lived and appropriated space, however, they can mean different things to different people: to local dwellers, travelers, painters, or mountaineers. Likewise, a ship is as much a physical space as it is a social space: a microcosm of social norms and codes of conduct, with a specific language attached to it as a vehicle of knowledge and means of communication. Considering these issues through the materials we work with, this workshop is the first step towards a new critical and engaging volume around “Spatial History and Its Sources.”

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ITSH Podcast #1: Roundtable Discussion on the “Refugee Crisis”

On 29th June, 2016, a few colleagues of the ITSH gathered for a roundtable discussion on the “Refugee Crisis” and explored some questions and problems related to recent coverage of the issue in Europe from our perspective as transnational historians.

Discussion participants were: Nikolaos Papadogiannis, Tomasz Kamusella, Konrad M. Lawson, and Bernhard Struck

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Participation in the Beltane Network Annual Gathering, Edinburgh 2016

The rationale behind and the structure of the event entitled “Betwixt and between? Greek and Spanish migrants settled in Scotland since the 1960s”, initiated by ITSH members Konrad Lawson and Nikolaos Papadogiannis and scheduled to take place in Edinburgh in late November 2016, was presented at the Annual Gathering of the Beltane Network.

More data linked with this public outreach activity that will take place in November will appear on this website in due time. It will be great to see some of those visiting our website there!

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Writing Global History and Its Challenges

There is an exciting graduate student workshop coming up at our neighbour, the University of Dundee: 

Writing Global History and Its Challenges
Saturday, 4 June 2016, 9.30 AM-4.30 PM

The workshop will include Jürgen Osterhammel (University of Konstanz) and Geoffrey Parker (The Ohio State University).

Graduate students at Scottish universities are invited to participate in a one-day workshop on Saturday, 4 June 2016, organized by the Scottish Centre for Global History at the University of Dundee.  The workshop theme is “Writing Global History and Its Challenges.” Professors Jürgen Osterhammel (University of Konstanz) and Geoffrey Parker (The Ohio State University) will assign readings in advance of the workshop, and lead the discussion.  The workshop is free of charge for graduate students at Scottish universities.  However, places are limited.

In order to reserve your spot, you need to send an e-mail to Dr. Martine J. van Ittersum (m.j. vanittersum [at] dundee.ac.uk) by Monday, 9 May 2016, at the latest.  The e-mail should include a one-page CV and a one-page summary of your research interests (500 words maximum).  Please do not wait with submitting your materials until the last possible moment.  You may be disappointed.

 

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Peripherien – New book series on “European History”

The first volume of the new book series Peripherien. Beiträge zur Europäischen Geschichte (eds. Christof Dejung, Johannes Feichtinger, Martin Lengwiler, Ulrike Lindner, Bernhard Struck, Jakob Vogel) has just come out. It is entitled: Ränder der Moderne. Neue Ansätze zur europäischen Geschichte (1860-1930), eds. Martin Lengwiler & Christof Dejung (Cologne Weimar Vienna: Böhlau, 2015).

Ränder der Moderne (Böhlau)

Ränder der Moderne (Böhlau)

The book series has grown out of our GRAINES network and the shared interest in European history in transnational perspective. European history, as we see it, needs to respond to and reflect on the recent trends in Global History. What we aim at is a series that combines monographs and edited volumes that highlight the polycentric and provicialised nature of Europe.

The first volume combines chapters that refer to transnational, postcolonial, and global history approaches, in oder to develop new perspective on European history. At the same time, the volume follows the idea to approach Europe from the margins, with an aim to flesh out similarities within Europe as well as conflicts beyond Europe.

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Let’s talk about Transnational History – Research in Dialogue

PhD researchers from the European University Institute, Florence have taken the initiative – they kicked of a series of interviews with historians from different national and institutional backgrounds on European history with a comparative and transnational focus. The series “Research in Dialogue – Dialogue in Research” is published by geschichte.transnational and HSozKult.

The series includes interviews with Lucy Riall, currently professor in Comparative History of Europe at the EUI, and Stéphane van Damme, professor in the History of Science at the EUI.

The latest interview has been published with Bernhard Struck, bernhard-struckformer director of our ITSH. The conversation addresses questions of direction of the field, the relevance of scales between micro and macro history, the neglected spatial element of transnational history, as well as potential tensions between national funding and an increasingly transnationally-driven research environment – and the world more broadly. Read the full interview here.

For more interviews with our colleagues from the EUI enjoy reading the interviews with Luca Molà, Ann Thomson or Alexander Etkind.

The ITSH and the EUI cooperate at the level of PhD exchanges via an Erasmus exchange link. If you are interested in coming to St Andrews or going to Florence, get in touch.

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When did time become global?

On Monday, 16 November the Institute for Transnational & Spatial History will be hosting Professor Sebastian Conrad from the Free University of Berlin. As part of our Modern History Seminar Series, Professor Conrad will be speaking on “The Revolution of Time in the Nineteenth Century: Global Perspectives

Sebastian Conrad

Sebastian Conrad

Time & Venue: 5.15pm, New Seminar Room, St John’s House, South Street. The talk is open to the public.

At 2pm there will be an informal seminar with Professor Conrad with postgraduate students (at invitation only).

Sebastian Conrad is professor in Global History at the Free University of Berlin since 2010, following a stint at the European University Institute in Florence. Originally his background is in Japanese and Western European history, which is reflected in his first monograph “In Quest for the Lost Nation” (2010), a comparison of German and Japanese historiographical traditions on the period of the

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

S. Conrad, What is Global History?

World Wars, the Third Reich and the Japanese Empire respectively.

His “Globalisation and the Nation” (2014) analyses the many and complex cross-border factors and actors, including Chinese or Polish migrations, that have shaped discourses of the nation and the concept of German labour in the Wilhelmine Empire.

Furthermore, he has published widely on colonialism and global history, including his “German Colonialism. A Short History” (2012). An introduction to global history is in preparation and will be out in early 2016.

 

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Chasing statistical nodes – Welcome Adam Dunn

We would like to warmly welcome Adam Dunn as a new (and partly old) PhD student at the ITSH. Adam took his undergraduate degree at the University of York in History, graduating in 2011 before he started his masters in early modern history at the University of St Andrews. After finishing his MLitt at St Andrews he took two gap years where he worked in various places including a law firm and the IT department of a paper mill.

In September 2015, Adam returned to St Andrews starting a research project under the working title “From words to numbers and maps. Transfers, networks and the transformations of statistical thinking in Britain, France and the German lands, c. 1780s-1840s”.

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Immigration Statistics US 1841-1860 (Wikipedia Commons)

Here is Adam: “I returned to St Andrews to peruse my PhD with Dr. Bernhard Struck at the ITSH. I returned for a number of reasons, not least the fantastic academic atmosphere in St Andrews, but also because of the burgeoning new Institute for Transnational & Spatial History. I am currently half way through my first term as a PhD and am auditing an MLitt module on core skills for transnational history, including historical mapping and database creation.” – A steep and hopefully fruitful learning curve.

Statistics are a fascinating topic, primarily studied and researched within the units that gave birth to modern statistics: the (nation) state. The project seeks to trace actors and networks spun by amateur statisticians – via travel, correspondence, journals – during the decades around 1800.  There is more on the project under PhDs.

Welcome Adam – enjoy reading your statistics!

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Dividing the World? – 4th GRAINES Summer School

The winter ahead – the next summer (school) in mind. We are pleased to announce the theme of our 4th GRAINES summer school: Dividing the World? Imperial Formations in Continental and Maritime Empires from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century. 

Following our summer schools in Menton (France), Vienna, St Andrews, GRAINES2016 will be hosted by our colleagues Ulrike Lindner and Dörte Lerp from the University of Cologne.

Information will be announced under grainesnetwork.com. You can follow us under the twitter hashtag #Graines2016. More to come soon.

 

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Global History Lecture – Welcome Emma Hunter

Dr Emma Hunter (Edinburgh) will be giving a research seminar paper on “Concepts of Democracy in Mid-Twentieth-Century Africa: Re-Imagining Political Accountability from the Bottom Up”. Emma Hunter

Emma Hunter is a lecturer in Global History at Edinburgh University. Her research focus is on African history in relation to political, intellectual and cultural history as well as the history of African print cultures. Her monograph “Political Thought and the Public Sphere in Tanzania: Freedom, Democracy and Citizenship in the Era of Decolonisation” was published with CUP in 2015. Congratulations, Emma!

Time & Venue: Monday 19 October 2015, New Seminar Room, School of History, University of St Andrews, 5.15pm.

More on the Modern History Research Seminar series – please see under Modern History Seminar .

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